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Going back over the cable carefully, the point where the break occurred was located, and after duly notifying the Seattle station of the exact location of the fault, the eel connected a tendril to each end of the cable, thereby establishing communication between the two stations.
          The cable ship Burnside was then started out to permanently repair the break and relieve the “Trouble Hunter” in his long vigil.

L. OBSTER.

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THE STAR—TUESDAY, APRIL 15, 1913
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Watch The Star tomorrow. We've told you something about the wonderful fish to be found in Puget sound. Tomorrow we'll spring the prize of 'em all.

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THE STAR—WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 1913

AT LAST! HERE'S ONE REAL HONEST-TO-GOODNESS PISCATORIAL CURIOSITY

          You have read in The Star of a number of freak fish discovered by piscatory artists on Puget sound. Some of the stories were real fishy. None of the claimants wore able to produce photographic evidence of their discoveries and “Vic,” The, Star cartoonist, was called upon to illustrate their probable appearance.
          Today, however, Roy Jensen, of the Scandinavian American bank, supplies the photographic proof of a bonafide rare fish, which he caught in the Wallace river last Sunday.
Here is his letter:
          “Editor The Star: I am sending you a picture of the head of a hybrid fish, caught last Sunday in the Wallace river, between Goldbar and Startup, which has the upper jaw of a sheep’s head, the lower jaw of salmon, meat of salmon, and markings of a rainbow trout and a trout tail.
          ”I have had considerable experience in 14 years of fishing, but never before has such an unusual combination fish been brought to my notice. Neither did the superintendent of the Goldbar hatchery ever see or hear of one like it. it has the true rainbow coloring and marking, but the meat of the steelhead. Its lower jaw is like that of a salmon, yet its tail is unmistakably that of a trout.

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Selections from The Seattle Star Written by Various
(Seattle: 1913) Original Text and Illustrations Public Domain License.
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