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KEY: Bestiae (Beasts) | Minuta animala (Small animals) | Aves (Birds) | Serpentes (Reptiles)
| Pisces (Fishes) | X Name Only | + Felids | * Notes | 1, 2, 3, etc. Reference No. | "( )" Latin class. | "[ ]" A.K.A.
Wymn. Prof. Walker D. Wyman, Tryn. Henry H. Tryon, Sudw. George B. Sudworth

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THIS NEW FISH HAS FUR.

        The polar trout, the only fur-bearing fish known to natural history, is the latest contribution of the arctic regions, according to John Bunker, of Northwood Center, N.H. Who returned to Boston recently after a two months' exploring trip in Greenland. He brought photographs and specimens of a strange fish, which he has called a polar trout. This peculiar denizen of the polar seas resembles a square tail trout in shape and gameness and attains ten to fifteen pounds in weight. The skin is covered with fine brownish fur, resembling the texture of mole-skin. This fur is lightly spotted with white. Bunker caught three specimens, two in a river and one in a small headwater pond about 200 miles north of Baffin Bay.

- Keowee Courier, November 12, 1913



ANOTHER HORNED RABBIT.

        J. P. Myers, who lives eight miles south of the city, was in Wichita yesterday, and was showing his friends a "freak" rabbit that he had killed on his farm, near Haysville.

        The rabbit was of the ordinary cottontail family, but had two well-developed horns, about four inches long, one on either side of the head. Mr. Myers said that he had killed several during the winter like the one he was showing yesterday.

        One man who saw the rabbit yesterday remarked that he rememebered a time, not so very far in the past, when all the rabbits that were killed had horns like those on the one shown by Mr. Myers. Even if this should be true, horned rabbits are enough of a rarity during the present day to make this one quite a curiosity.

- The Wichita Daily Eagle, Februrary 17, 1904



MR. OPSAHL SEES QUEER ANIMAL.

It Haunts the Woods About His Country Place at Lake.

          A. H. Opsahl asserts excitedly that it is a surviving representative of a supposedly extinct saurian that looks like a cross between an igunana and a rocking horse, and offers to produce witnesses to the strange nocturnal proclivities of the uncanny brute that haunts the woods about his country place. Ruritania. Lake Minnetonka. The hodag is supposed to be dead. As a matter of fact "there weren't no such animal." A lot of lumbermen over in Michigan faked up a hideous looking reptile and had a picture taken of him, which the Northwestern Lumberman printed, but somebody blew the game and the hideous as an inhabitant of Dante's dread picture, proved to be a stuffed nothing in particular.

          But Mr. Opsahl swears that the Michiganders builded better than they knew. If Opsahl has not discovered a hodag he certainly has turned up some awful creature that bellows like an elephant in a rage, wallows in the swamp and grunts, jumps stiff legged from the dead grass and brush of dark nights, with its spinal projections all standing, and generally keeps people at Orono Point wondering what sort of horror has invaded their sylvan retreat.

          To come down to cases, there is a determined hunt going on from Ruritania and surrounding estates after some strange creature that has been seen and shot at a dozen times during the past winter, but which seems to bear a charmed life. Opsahl himself emptied a double load of 13 B B shot at the beast or reptile, the range being less than 30 yards in the moonlight. The shot was heard to rattle like hail on the scaly coat of the creature, which promptly emitted a sound which resembled, roughly speaking, a cross between the laugh of a hyena and the bawl of an indignant cow.

          Several parties have visited the locality during the winter in an effort to round up the strange visitor to Ruritania, but without success, the animal making its appearance only at night and preferably, it seems, on dark nights.

          "I don't know what breed this creature belongs to," said Mr. Opsahl yesterday, "but what I do know is there is nothing in the books describing him. He is scaly all over like a big fish. I have seen his scales shining in the moonlight and taken a steady shot over the bough of a tree at him. He is not in the least injured by being shot at with any sort of small arm. I tried a 35-caliber Winchester on him twice and know that he was hit, because he jumped and made for the woods as hard as he could go, bellowing fiercely. When he runs his tail is held high above his back and it has spines sticking out all along its length like an Iguana. I never could get a good look at the creature's head, but I've got a picture of it in my mind. I should like to get a photograph of this thing with a good sized camera, but its habits are nocturnal and the only picture we shall ever get will be taken after in dead."

          The prevailing opinion is that the creature which has created so much discussion it the Point is an escaped specimen from some circus or side show. No report of such an escape is remmebered, but the people who witnessed the latest "hodag" refuse to be laughed out of contenance. Mr. Opsahl takes a walk around his place every night in an effort to get another shot at the animal. He has provided himself with a 45-90 Winchester and hopes to report results within a few days.

- The Saint Paul Globe, April 20, 1903



A WONDERFUL THING OF LIFE.

The Snake Story Season Opened
With Room by a Georgia Genius.
Cumming Clarion.

          In our boyhood we often heard of a hoop-snake, one that, bringing its head and tail together, rolled over and over like a wagon wheel. It is said that this snake did its execution with its tail, that being pointed like a needle. We never ' had the terror of seeing one of them, but did when about eight years old, see a jointed snake. The joints were about six inches long. When alarmed the snake fell to pieces, the head joint darting off like an arrow to a place of concealment. That was the last snake of the kind we ever saw until quite recently we saw a hoop-jointed make as we were walking leisurely one day through our field.

          All of a sudden we were startled out of ourselves by something rolling by us, which looked like the rim of a buggy wheel without the spokes. When it had passed about ten steps beyond us, in making an effort to turn, it accidentally struck the end of a projecting rail.

          This must have alarmed it, for all at once it fell to pieces, and the head joint darted through a crack of the fence and into the swamp as quickly as possible.

          Remembering the jointed snake of our boyhood and that our grandfather told us if we would watch we would see the head return for the joints left, as badly as we were scared we determined to watch and wait the head's return. Not unmindful that we had been told by them of old time that the only protection from a hoop snake was to get behind a tree or stump on time opposite side from the one it was coming, and we took a position behind an old stump and waited for developments.

          It was not long before the head came slowly and cautiously through the crack of the fence, raised itself to an angle of forty-five degrees, looked in every direction and then commenced the work of rejoining its body and tail to its head. This was soon done. Its next movement was to rear itself up perpendicularly, or in other words to stand on its tail.

          As the head went up we distinctly saw that each joint possessed India rubber qualities, for as it Went up each joint became extended until when the perpendicular position was attained, the head was eight feet high. Having taken its bearings it gradually contracted to four feet. It then made a circular dart for its tail and without more ado [adieu] rolled off rapidly in the direction of Atlanta.

- Maysville Evening Bulletin, June 3, 1882
  1. Treesqueak (Arborexusta stridens; Tryn.)2, 18
  2. Jimplecute [Jimplicute] 3, b
  3. Fish Hound 3
  4. Teakettler 5, 6, 9
  5. Squidgicum-Squee 18
  6. Belled Buzzards 3, a
  7. Hoopsnake [Hornsnake] (Serpenscirculousus caudavenenifer; Tryn.)2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 18, 23
  8. Billdad (Saltipiscator falcorostratus; Sudw.)1, 9, 18
  9. Santer (Nadiocties palustris; Tryn.)2
  10. Wapaloosie (Geometrigradus cilioretractus; Sudw.)1, 9
  11. Cross-Eyed Crud 3
  12. Giddy Fish (Parvipiseis; Wymn.)5, 8
  13. Bedcat (Cimecofelis ferrignus; Wymn.)4, 9
  14. Guyuscutus [Guiaskuitus, Guyanosa] [Sky Floogle (Avis horribilus spurious; Wymn.)] 23
  15. Rubberado (Erethizon neoprenicum; Wymn.)8, 18, 26
  16. Whirling Whimpus (Turbinoccissus nebuloides; Sudw.)1, 2, 8, 9, b
  17. Rumptifusel [Rumtifusel] (Villosus sumptuosus; Tryn.) 2, 5, 8, 9
  18. X Darby-Hick 3
  19.      Whing-whang 18
  20. Happy Auger 15
  21. Whangdoodle [Kingdoodle] 3
  22. Upland Trout (Salmo culiphilis volans; Wymn.) 5, 6, 9
  23. Wunk 18
  24. Gumberoo (Megalogaster repercussus; Sudw.) 1, 2, 5, 8, 9
  25. Squonk (Lacrimacorpus dissolvens; Sudw.) 1, 2, 6, 9, 18
  26. Picoderm 3
  27.      Dismal Sauger 12
  28. Joint Snake [Glass Snake] (Serpentes fragmenticus; Wymn.) 3, 9, 11, 18
  29. Snallygaster [Bovapulous, Go-Devil] 21
  30. Rhinelapus i
  31. Tripodero (Collapsofemuris geocatapeltes; Sudw.) 1, 2, 5, 8, 18, 26
  32. Mileormore [Clew-Bird] 3
  33. Hinge-tailed Bingbuffer [Glyptodon] (Glyptodontis petrobolus; Wymn.) 3, 18
  34.      Whistling Whoo-hoo 3
  35. Pinnacle Grouse (Avis gyrovolitatus; Wymn.) 5, 6, 9
  36. Bald-knob Buzzard 3, a
  37. Moskitto [Beeskeeter, Bumbelito, Arkansas Snipe] (Insecta gigantious; Wymn.) 5, 9, a
  38.      Windyo 18
  39. Whimpering Whingding 15
  40. Whiffenpoof [Hoopajuba, Whiffle-poofle, Gilli-Galoo Fish] (Piscisabsurdus tumescens; Tryn.) 2, 18
  41. Augerino [Augurine] (Serpentes Spirillum; Wymn.) 7, 9, f
  42. Razorback 3
  43. Fur-Bearing Trout [Furred Salmon] (Salmo hirsutis tonsorius; Wymn.) 4, 8, 9, 19, 26
  44. Cougar Fish (Pterygium unguis acutis; Wymn.) 5
  45. Central American Whintosser (Cephalovertens semperambulatus; Sudw.) 1, 9
  46. X   Yowho Bird 3
  47. Camp Chipmonk 5
  48. X Vociferous Antissmus 14
  49. X Barking Moon Crumbler 14
  50. Wampus Cat [Gallywampus] * 2, 4, 9, c
  51. Snow Wasset (Mustelinopsis subitivorax; Sudw.) 1, 9
  52. Hicklesnoopus + 3
  53. Painter + 3, b
  54. Orance + 3
  55. Silvercat + (Felis glabraspiculata; Tryn.) 2, 5, 8
  56. X   Kankagee 20
  57. Ice Worms (Vermes frigidus; Wymn.) 8, 9
  58. Hangdown 5, 9
  59. X Ding-Toed Awk 15
  60.      Whooper Hopper 19
  61. Dingmaul + [Plunkus, Ding-Ball] (Saxicatellus vociferens; Tryn.) 2, 13
  62. Blue Ox (Taurus azureus) 12
  63. Swamp Booger j
  64. Luferlang (Spinacaerulea tresarticulosus; Tryn.) 2, 4, 5, 9, 18
  65. Gillygaloo [Galoopus] 4, 3, 5, 8, 9
  66. Argopelter [Agropelter] (Anthrocephalus craniofractens; Sudw.) 1, 2, 4, 8, 9, a
  67. Roperite (Rhynchoropus flagelliformis; Sudw.) 1, 2, 5, 6, 8, 9
  68. Booger-Owls 2, 3
  69. Whirligig Fish (Piscis gyrinicus porcinus; Wymn.) 5, 9
  70. X Linkumsluice 2
  71. Geek-Squaw 3
  72. Snawfus 3, 18
  73. Hidebehind [Nighbehind, High-Behind] (Ursus dissimulans; Tryn.) 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 18
  74. Flittericks 5, 8, 9
  75. Bogie-Bird 3
  76. Wowzer + 3
  77. Timmerdoodle 18
  78. Come-at-a-body (Quadrupes inprovisus; Tryn.) 2, 18
  79. Hodag (Bovine spiritualis; Shepard, E. S.) * 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 23
  80. Log Gar (Lepisosteus longicornus multidentata; Wymn.) 5
  81. Goofang [Goofgang] (Xerophthalmus opistobaenos; Wymn.) 6, 5, 8
  82. Will-Am-Alone 13
  83. Ring-Tailed Tooter 3
  84. Milamo (Avis vermivora; Wymn.) 9, 18
  85. X   Toodalong Buzzard 3
  86. X   Jayhawk 20
  87. Glawackus 8
  88. Waterloo Plover 3, a
  89. Waterloo Bonney 3, a
  90.      Whopperknocker 2
  91. Leprocaun (Simiidiabolus hibernicus horribilis; Sudw.) 1
  92. Snipe (Scolopax inexplicabilis; Tryn.) 2
  93. Swamp Auger (Natator Palustris var. perforens; Tryn.) 3, 14
  94. Giasticutus 3
  95. Taneycomo Turtle 3
  96. Snow Snake [Shovel-Tailed Snow Snake] (Aestatesommus hiemepericulosus; Tyrn.) 2, 5, 9
  97. Snoligoster (Dorsohastatus caudirotula; Sudw.) 1, 9
  98. Phillyloo [Philamaloo, Gillygoo] 3, 5, 8, 16, 20
  99. Ball-Tailed Cat + (Felis candaglobosa; Tryn.) 2
  100. Gowrow (Verdisquamata cruribrevis; Wymn.) 3, 9, 18
  101. Goofus [Filla-Ma-Loo, Flu-fly, Whiffle, Guffel] (Fulica stultusregrediens; Tryn.) 2, 4, 5, 3, 8, 9, 18
  102. Dungavenhooter (Crocodilus hauriens; Tryn.) 2
  103. Bassigator  
  104. Splintercat (Felynx arbordiffisus; Sudw.) 1, 2, 4, 9, 18
  105. X Lopsided Awger  
  106. Celofay 2
  107. Sidehill Gouger (Membriinequales declivitatis; Tryn.) * 2, 5, 8, 18, 23
  108. Funeral Mountain Terrashot (Funericorpus displosissimum; Sudw.) 1, 9
  109. Tote-Road Shagamaw (Bipedester delusissimus; Sudw.) 1, 2, 5, 9
  110. X Mugwump Bird 20
  111. Keyhole Crab (Pinchus Virginianus)
  112. Cactus Cat + (Cactifelinus inebrius; Sudw.) 1, 2, 3, 8, 9
  113. Hyampom Hog Bear (Ursus unimorsus amantiporcus; Sudw.) 1, 9
  114.      Kickle Snifters [Hickle Snifters] 18, 20
  115. Cabbit b
  116. Ponjureen 3
  117. Hugag (Rythmopes inarticulatus; Sudw.) 1, 2, 9, 18, 23
  118. Chawgreen 3
  119. Cross-Feathered Snee 2
  120. Slide-Rock Bolter (Macrostoma saxiperrumptus; Sudw.) 1, 9, 18
  121. Bear-Behind 3
  122. Axehandle Hound (Canis Consumens; Tryn.) 2, 4, 5, 6, 9, a
  123. Columbia River Sand Squink (Anguillamvorax coruscens; Tryn.) 2
  124. Jackalope [Gooklookus] (Lepus temperamentalus) 4, 9, 23
  125. Tailypo  
  126. Old Spider Legs, the Eight Legged Horse (Pseudohippus arachupus; Wymn.) 4, 9
  127. Gee-Gee Bird (Avis cryostatious; Wymn.) 4, 9
  128. Green-Footed Windpiper (Verdipus folliicutus; Wymn.) 4, 9
  129. Tripodero Crane 4
  130. Luebker Eagle [Wild Blue Yonder Wonder] (Volitodactyla ionosphericum; Wymn.) 4
  131. Hoot-Peckers (Bube erythorcephalu; Wymn.) 4, 9
  132. Dingbat (Bunkeri edithil; Wymn.) 4, 9
  133. Milking Trout 4
  134. Owl-eyed Ripple Skipper 4
  135. Vilas County Tiger + 4, 9
  136. Engineer-Rat [Tonnage-Rat] 4, 9
  137. Three-Tailed Bavalorous (Theriornis tricauda unicornus; Wymn.) 4, 9
  138. Noon Bird 2
  139.       Old Walleyes  
  140. Jersey Devil (Teratos incomprehensibilis; Wymn.) 8, 26
  141. Sneeze-Duck [Mu] 10, 11
  142. Filo 10
  143. Loup-Cervier [Lucivee] + 7, 20
  144. Gilaopolis 11
  145. Hellidid 11
  146. Whiffletit 17, 11
  147. Flannel-Throated Golosh [Arctic Bird of the Polar Seas] 17
  148. Milking Snake (Ophidia galactophilla; Wymn.)3, 9
  149. X Left-Footed Beechaser 11
  150. Kissing Bug (Insecta osculatus amoratus; Wymn.) 9
  151. X Giant Goober-Bug 11
  152. Bull-Bat 17
  153. Pamoola + 13
  154. Bog Hop (Castoralces platycerous; Wymn.) 9
  155. X Waw-Waw Bird 3
  156. Hairy Timber Rattlers 3
  157. Stone-Eating Gyascutus 4, 5, 9
  158. Pomola 2
  159. X Mountain Rabbit 20
  160. Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus (Octopus paxarbolis; Zapato, L.) k
  161. X Moogie 3
  162. Horse-Hair Snake 9
  163. Devil-Jack Diamond Fish (Litholepis adamantimus; Audubon, J. J.) 24, 9
  164. Cement Worms [Rock Worms] 9
  165. Beast of 'Busco [Oscar] 23
  166. Turkey Snake (Serpentes horribilus; Wymn.) 9
  167. X Koohopper 11
  168. Whickle (Insecta oliohaustorium; Wymn.) 9
  169. Who's Who Bug (Insecta quia-quia; Wymn.) 9
  170. Hairy-Legged Stuka Parrot (Psittacida crusihirsutus; Wymn.) 9
  171. Rattlerrabbit (Lepus casteneta; Wymn.) 9, 26
  172. Ratchet Owl (Bubo cephalovolutum; Wymn.) 9
  173. Big-Tailed Lynx + (Lynx magnacerous canadensis; Wymn.) 9
  174. Cowaskie (Opistodromus; Wymn.) 9
  175. Whiffle-Whiffle (Geocococcyx pygalgicum; Wymn.) 9
  176. Man-Eater (Philanthropus sarcophagii; Wymn.) 9
  177. Pricuricu (Ornis cynophilus; Wymn.) 9
  178. Flambeau Ambler (Piscis carniversa; Wymn.)9
  179. Sandhill Perch (Perca areniculus; Wymn.)9, 26
  180. Fisher River Pond Borer (Limnocetes evelorhyneus; Wymn.) 9
  181. Gyanther (Monocerate archihippus; Wymn.) 9
  182. Water Grouger (Lepisostens unicornus; Wymn.) 9
  183. Pickaliker (Axeansa xylotherepticus; Wymn.) 9
  184. Rattlerrabbit 9, 25
  185. Wamfahoopus (Limmertakus boottii; Boott, F.)
  186. Flatnose Double-Fin 24
  187. Big Mouth Sturgeon 24
  188. Toad Mudcat [Mudfish, Mudsucker, Toadfish] 24
  189. Buffalo Carp Sucker 24
  190. White-Eyed Barbot 24
  191. Hydrophobia Skunk 26
  192.       Flycatcher Plant 26
  193. Shoo Fly 25
  194. Petrified Bird 23, 25
  195. Swan Valley Monster 25
  196. X Wympsis 2
  197. Ararie 9
  198. Ice Otter (Lutra Atlanticus lachrymosa; Wymn.) 9
  199. Tajar (Amnesias lethalis; Wymn.) 9
  200. Bigfoot (Gigantopithecus blacki; Krantz, G.) 9
  201. Wouser (Ursus ferositas delusissimus; Wymn.) 9
  202. Bastard Cat 2
  203. Gushington Slimeback
  204. Salvager Sucker
  205. Opium-Pipe Fish
  206. Cable Cleaning Cropple
  207. Motor-Cop Carp
  208. Speedsimp Sucker
  209. Rust-Eating Perch
  210. Keyhole Crab (Pinchus Virginianus)
  211. Hydra Headed Amphibian Grampet
  212. Wabbergoo
❦ REFERENCES ❦


* 1. Other names include, but are not limited to: Sidehill Gouger, Dodger, Badger, Guano, Hoofer, Slicker, Walloper, Wowser, Winder, or Sauger; Cutter Cuss, Dodger, Goatithro, Gudaphro, Gwinter, Haggletopelter, Hunkus, Wapahoofus, Mountain Stem-winder, Prock, Rickaboo Racker, Side-Swiper, Sidewinder, Walloper, and Yamhill Lunkus. 2. The sidehill gouger's appearance itself is not necessarily link to one particular temporal or mythical creature. A few of its variants however, the sidehill hoofer3 (favoring a beaver, castorine; 107c), side-hill bear11 (ursidine; 107d), rackabore (Sus lithotrepanicus; Wymn.) 8, 26 (suidine; 107e), wyman wowser4 (feline; 50f), and sidehill dodge hodag (hodaine; 79d), are.   3. Another couple of its variants, as listed by Tryon, the powerful and long-necked yamhill lunkus2 (var. robustissimus; 107a) and a nameless, hairless breed2 (var. semihirsutus; 107b.) 4. Subspecies of the hodag include var. Black (79a), Cave (79b), Shovel-Nose (79c), and Sidehill Dodge (79d.) 5. Subspecies of the wampus cat include var. Gally (50a, common variety), Whistiling (50b, sirenic variety), Conway (50c, hexaped), Tryon (50d, having pantographic forelimbs), Ewah (50e, human shapeshifter), and Wyman Wowser (50f, akin to the sidehill gouger.)
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