T H E   S E A T T L E   S T A R
“ M A R V E L O U S   C R I T T E R S   O F   P U G E T   S O U N D


Move your mouse over here!

THE STAR—FRIDAY, APRIL 18, 1913
blank space
WHAT HO, FANS! TAKE A LOOK AT THIS,
THE FISH PLAY BALL TOO
blank space
          Professor Phish Phaquer’s Ima d’Arm, has joined her uncle in the attempt to interest the people of Seattle in the rare fish of Puget sound. In the morning’s mail was the following contribution from Ima:
blank space
The Bat Bass and Ball Fish.
          Editor The Star: You are doing a great work in the fish line and I am glad that my uncle has taken it up. Uncle and I used to have great sport out in Elliott bay, watching the spurious marine fungi chasing each other about. Of course, Uncle Phish knows more about this subject than I, having studied it for years, but I desire to call your attention to one which he has never seen. In fact, I never noted it myself until last Tuesday.
          Enclosed you will find a picture of two sea animals, which I have taken the privilege of naming them the bat bass and ball fish.
          While watching the sea life through a water glass, over near Alki point Tuesday afternoon, I saw a long fish shaped like a ball bat, with its tail wedged in between two stones and its body lying on the bottom. Its peculiar shape and markings caused me to keep close watch on it. After a few moments a little round fish, not much larger than a baseball, came sailing by, and all of a sudden up swung the fish from the bottom and hit a smart rap, sending it several yards through the water. This was so unusual that I kept my eyes on the ball fish and noticed that it went back to the place from which I first seen it start and made for the lair of the bat fish again. This time the bat fish swung too soon and missed it. The little ball fish wiggled its tall and showed signs of pleasure. It seemed that they were playing a sort of submarine baseball game, the object being for the ball fish to swim by the bat bass without getting hit. Chances seemed to be pretty even for 16 tries, which I watched, the bat fish lost by one miss. I enclose a sketch of the two as they appeared through the water glass. Yours truly,

IMA d’ARN PHAQUER


Move your mouse over here!

Selections from The Seattle Star Written by Various
(Seattle: 1913) Original Text and Illustrations Public Domain License.
Copyright © 2006-2017 Thrill Land.